‘Indian Pale Ales, but no Indians’

Like so many people of colour living in Britain, there can sometimes be a haze surrounding how opaque we ought to be with our cultures in a Western society. As gentrification lays its seeds all over Britain, we can find elements of different cultures being mimicked without a magnified presence of the people from who they are influenced.

A progress report by Alex Fenton highlights, with regards to gentrification in London, that changes in cultural dimensions and inclusions can be attributed to gentrification. This could be mirroring the underlying classist and even racist attitudes of the UK even today. Seemingly in these developed areas you can find Indian Pale Ale in every pub, but no Indians.

As a third generation British Asian, it is this climate that makes it ever confusing as to how much acceptance we will face from our British counterparts in society. With Indian influences fuelling many spiritual paths and trends in the Western World, there seems to glaze over much of its culture. For example, with the love of Indian food being prominent, but the lack of representation of Indians on mainstream cooking channels. This is something that is changing and education is at the front of this.

This is all contributory to cultural appropriation, which is now being highlighted by British Asians and people of colour more and more. As the new generation in a world that is seemingly getting smaller and smaller, there is no room for this ignorance and we should not shy away from certain parts of our culture out of fear of that part not being accepted. Although it is not the role of people of colour to explain the inherent confusions that can come with balancing two cultures  whilst living in the west, we can now call out this appropriation and try and educate our peers.

Third Generation South Asian

A progress report by Alex Fenton highlights, with regards to gentrification in London, that changes in cultural dimensions and inclusions can be attributed to gentrification. This could be mirroring the underlying classist and even racist attitudes of the UK even today. Seemingly in these developed areas you can find Indian Pale Ale in every pub, but no Indians.

As a third generation British Asian, it is this climate that makes it ever confusing as to how much acceptance we will face from our British counterparts in society. With Indian influences fuelling many spiritual paths and trends in the Western World, there seems to glaze over much of its culture. For example, with the love of Indian food being prominent, but the lack of representation of Indians on mainstream cooking channels. This is something that is changing and education is at the front of this.

This is all contributory to cultural appropriation, which is now being highlighted by British Asians and people of colour more and more. As the new generation in a world that is seemingly getting smaller and smaller, there is no room for this ignorance and we should not shy away from certain parts of our culture out of fear of that part not being accepted. Although it is not the role of people of colour to explain the inherent confusions that can come with balancing two cultures  whilst living in the west, we can now call out this appropriation and try and educate our peers.